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 At Leahy-Wolf, we are experts at recommending best maintenance practices as well as selecting lubricants that are right for your operation.  We will ensure that you are getting the longest life possible out of those lubricant products and would be happy to help you initiate an oil condition monitoring program.  

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INJECTION MOLDING

Injection molding is a manufacturing process for producing parts by injecting material into a mold. Injection molding can be performed with a host of materials including, glasses, elastomers, confections, and most commonly thermoplastic and thermosetting polymers. Material for the part is fed into a heated barrel, mixed, and forced into a mold cavity, where it cools and hardens to the configuration of the cavity. After a product is designed, usually by an industrial designer or an engineer, molds are made by a mold-maker (or toolmaker) from metal, usually either steel or aluminum, and precision-machined to form the features of the desired part. Injection molding is widely used for manufacturing a variety of parts, from the smallest components to entire body panels of cars.  

These machines use:

AW-32 /46 / 68 Hydraulic oil per manufacturer specification as well as waylubes and greases on the slides.

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EXTRUSION

Plastics extrusion is a high-volume manufacturing process in which raw plastic is melted and formed into a continuous profile. Extrusion produces items such as pipe/tubing, weather stripping, fencing, deck railings, window frames, plastic films and sheeting, thermoplastic coatings, and wire insulation.

The gearboxes that drive the screw typically use:

 ISO 220 / 320 / 460 gear oil. 

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BLOW MOLDING

Blow molding is a manufacturing process by which hollow plastic parts are formed. In general, there are three main types of blow molding: extrusion blow molding, injection blow molding, and injection stretch blow molding. The blow molding process begins with melting down the plastic and forming it into a parison or in the case of injection and injection stretch blow moulding (ISB) a preform. (Pictured Above) The parison is a tube-like piece of plastic with a hole in one end through which compressed air can pass.

The parison is then clamped into a mold and air is blown into it. The air pressure then pushes the plastic out to match the mold. Once the plastic has cooled and hardened the mold opens up and the part is ejected.

EXTRUSION BLOW MOLDING

In Extrusion Blow Molding (EBM), plastic is melted and extruded into a hollow tube (a parison). This parison is then captured by closing it into a cooled metal mold. Air is then blown into the parison, inflating it into the shape of the hollow bottle, container, or part. After the plastic has cooled sufficiently, the mold is opened and the part is ejected. Continuous and Intermittent are two variations of Extrusion Blow Molding. In Continuous Extrusion Blow Molding the parison is extruded continuously and the individual parts are cut off by a suitable knife.

INJECTION BLOW MOLDING

The process of injection blow molding (IBM) is used for the production of hollow glass and plastic objects in large quantities. In the IBM process, the polymer is injection molded onto a core pin; then the core pin is rotated to a blow molding station to be inflated and cooled. This is the least-used of the three blow molding processes and is typically used to make small medical and single serve bottles. The process is divided into three steps: injection, blowing and ejection.

INJECTION STRETCH BLOW MOLDING

This has two main different methods, namely Single-stage and two-stage process. Single-stage process is again broken down into 3-station and 4-station machines. In the two-stage injection stretch blow molding process, the plastic is first molded into a “preform” using the injection molding process. These preforms are produced with the necks of the bottles, including threads (the “finish”) on one end. These preforms are packaged, and fed later (after cooling) into a reheat stretch blow molding machine. In the ISB process, the preforms are heated (typically using infrared heaters) above their glass transition temperature, then blown using high-pressure air into bottles using metal blow molds. The preform is always stretched with a core rod as part of the process.

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